jamesjeanart:

Boy Portrait. Acrylic on Wood Panel, 12 x 12”, 2014.

jamesjeanart:

Girl Portrait. Acrylic on Wood Panel, 12 x 12”, 2014.

brianmichaelbendis:

X-Men: Days of Future Past by Alex Maleev

likeafieldmouse:

Patrick Tourneboef
likeafieldmouse:

Patrick Tourneboef
likeafieldmouse:

Patrick Tourneboef
likeafieldmouse:

Patrick Tourneboef
likeafieldmouse:

Patrick Tourneboef
likeafieldmouse:

Patrick Tourneboef
likeafieldmouse:

Patrick Tourneboef
likeafieldmouse:

Patrick Tourneboef
brianmichaelbendis:

Original endpapers by Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez from Love and Rockets trade paperbacks vols. 1-7 and 9, published by Fantagraphics, 1985-1992. brianmichaelbendis:

Original endpapers by Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez from Love and Rockets trade paperbacks vols. 1-7 and 9, published by Fantagraphics, 1985-1992. brianmichaelbendis:

Original endpapers by Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez from Love and Rockets trade paperbacks vols. 1-7 and 9, published by Fantagraphics, 1985-1992. brianmichaelbendis:

Original endpapers by Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez from Love and Rockets trade paperbacks vols. 1-7 and 9, published by Fantagraphics, 1985-1992. brianmichaelbendis:

Original endpapers by Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez from Love and Rockets trade paperbacks vols. 1-7 and 9, published by Fantagraphics, 1985-1992. brianmichaelbendis:

Original endpapers by Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez from Love and Rockets trade paperbacks vols. 1-7 and 9, published by Fantagraphics, 1985-1992. brianmichaelbendis:

Original endpapers by Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez from Love and Rockets trade paperbacks vols. 1-7 and 9, published by Fantagraphics, 1985-1992. brianmichaelbendis:

Original endpapers by Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez from Love and Rockets trade paperbacks vols. 1-7 and 9, published by Fantagraphics, 1985-1992.

brianmichaelbendis:

Original endpapers by Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez from Love and Rockets trade paperbacks vols. 1-7 and 9, published by Fantagraphics, 1985-1992.

"Canción de cuna / Cântec de Leagân" from Quiasma on Vimeo.

"Canción de cuna / Cântec de Leagân"

Realización: Bastardilla y Bárbara Santos
» bastardilla.org

Música: canción de cuna rumana, autor anónimo
Cantante: Gabriela Traistaru
Agradecemos a Leonardo, Raúl y a los peces de La Casa del Arrayán
2014, Tepoztlán

Tati from Miguel Endara on Vimeo.

A short film of Tati Suarez painting a wall mural in downtown Hollywood, Florida.

Art by Tati Suarez // tatisuarez.com
Music by Wax Tailor // waxtailor.com
Directed by Miguel Endara // miguelendara.com
Song Download // bit.ly/1dfpjAT

Special thanks to The Downtown Hollywood Mural Project and Hollywood CRA.

To see the final image, go to i.imgur.com/vZFOgnF.jpg
To visit the wall in person, go to goo.gl/maps/ojGmJ

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Sarah Gillespie
Ink and charcoal works darksilenceinsuburbia:

Sarah Gillespie
Ink and charcoal works darksilenceinsuburbia:

Sarah Gillespie
Ink and charcoal works darksilenceinsuburbia:

Sarah Gillespie
Ink and charcoal works darksilenceinsuburbia:

Sarah Gillespie
Ink and charcoal works

mas Simpsons aqui

mas Simpsons aqui

platinumcheese:

Hello @vhils (at Abbot Kinney)

“Alcanzó a reconocerla en el tumulto a través de las lágrimas del dolor irrepetible de morirse sin ella, y la miró por última vez para siempre jamás con los ojos más luminosos, más tristes y más agradecidos que ella no le vio nunca en medio siglo de vida en común, y alcanzó a decirle con el último aliento:
- Sólo Dios sabe cuánto te quise.”
Fragmento de El amor en los tiempos del cólera, Gabriel García Márquez (via poesianoerestu)
planetaryfolklore:

ryanpanos:
Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex | Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
planetaryfolklore:

ryanpanos:
Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex | Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
planetaryfolklore:

ryanpanos:
Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex | Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
planetaryfolklore:

ryanpanos:
Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex | Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
planetaryfolklore:

ryanpanos:
Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex | Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
planetaryfolklore:

ryanpanos:
Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex | Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
planetaryfolklore:

ryanpanos:
Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex | Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.
planetaryfolklore:

ryanpanos:
Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex | Via
A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.
The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.
Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.

planetaryfolklore:

ryanpanos:

Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex | Via

A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar. An abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight. It could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it’s just the U.S. military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees.

The Library of Congress has an extraordinary set of images documenting the Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex in Cavalier County, North Dakota, showing it in various states of construction and completion.

Taken for the U.S. government by photographer Benjamin Halpern, the particular images seen here show the central pyramid—pyramid, obelisk, monument, megastructure: whatever you want to call it—that served as the site’s missile control building. Like the eye of Sauron crossed with Giza, it looks in all directions, its all-seeing white circles staring endlessly at invisible airborne objects across the horizon.

(vía aleskot)